Testimonials

»Return from Golgatha. Stories of my life«

Picture: Cover »Return from Golgatha. Stories of my life«

Arkadij Iossifowitsch Chasin (*1930) was born in Odessa on the Black Sea. His parents was Jews. As German and Romanian troops occupy the Ukrainian seaport in October 1941, all Jews must move into a ghetto. Arkadij's father died there. His mother, his sister and he come to ›Transnistria‹ in the camp Domanjowka for forced labor. After their liberation in spring 1944, the family returns to Odessa. Arkadij is a mechanic at the Black Sea Shipping Company, where he worked until 1998. 2002 he and his wife move to Germany.

Arkadij Chasin
»Return from Golgatha. Stories of my life« 
Edited by Sarah Friedrich and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2016

ISBN: 978-3-942240-23-9
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at info[at]stiftung-denkmal.de

»To the opposite bank of the Memel. Escape from Ghetto Kovno«

Shalom Eilati (born 1933) is from Kovno, the former capitol of Lithuania. In July 1941 he and his family were forced to move into the Ghetto, which was erected by the German occupying force. After his father, Israel Kaplan, was deported to the Ghetto in Riga, Shalom, his sister Jehudit and his mother Lea were on their own. After the ›Kinder-Aktion‹ in March 1944 Lea managed the escape of her children. He never saw his mother and sister again but was reunited with his father in March 1946 in Bavaria. The following month he emigrated to Palestine, where his autobiography Crossing the river was published in 1999.

Shalom Eilati
»To the opposite bank of the Memel. Escape from Ghetto Kovno«
Edited by Sarah Friedrich and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2016


ISBN: 978-3-942240-22-2
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at info[at]stiftung-denkmal.de

»Destroyed Childhood and Youth. My Life and Survival in Berlin«

Picture: Cover of the testimonial »Destroyed Childhood and Youth. My Life and Survival in Berlin«

Regina and her twin sister Ruth war born in 1930 in the German capital. Her father escaped to America in 1938. When their mother died of tuberculosis in 1940, Regina and Ruth came to the Jewish children's home in the Fehrbelliner Street, where they found a new family. After the liquidation of the orphanage foster parents took care of them. After the foster parents was arrested the non-Jewish uncle of Regina and Ruth, the brother of their mother, accomodate them. In 1945 the Red Army freed Berlin. In 1948 the sisters migrated to Israel, where they married and living happily ever after.

Regina Steinitz with Regina Scheer
»Destroyed Childhood and Youth. My Life and Survival in Berlin«
Edited by Leonore Martin and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2014

ISBN: 978-3-942240-16-1
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»Escape Story. How a Young Girl Survived the Holocaust«

Eva Erben (b. 1930) comes from the Sudetenland. Her parents, Jindrich and Marta Löwidt, decided in 1936 to move to Prague. Her life changed dramatically after the invasion of the Wehrmacht on 15 March 1939. In December 1941, the Löwidts were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. The father was abducted to Kaufering in 1944, where he was murdered in the same year. Eva and her mother were sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau, then to a subcamp of the concentration camp Gross-Rosen. In February 1945, the SS forced them on a »death march« that the mother did not survive. Eva managed to escape and was hidden by a Czech family. In 1948 she emigrated with her husband from France to Israel.

Eva Erben
»Escape Story. How a Young Girl Survived the Holocaust«
Edited by
Daniel Baranowski and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2014

ISBN: 978-3-942240-10-9
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»I promised my mother to return home. My life between Radom and Paris«

Picture: Cover of the the Testimonial »I promised my mother to return home«

Moniek Baumzecer (b. 1919) was born into a Hasidic Jewish family in the Polish Radom. 1930 the family moved to Lodz. After the invasion of the Wehrmacht in February 1940 Baumzecers were forced to move into the ghetto. His parents and siblings were murdered by the SS in 1942 in Chelmno. Moniek signed up for working in the Deutsches Reich in late 1940, where he had to build the Reichsautobahn in Eastern Brandenburg. In early 1942, he was forced to work in the labor camp Christianstadt and after conviction for »race defilement« in November he was deported to the Mauthausen concentration camp, in the summer 1943 to Auschwitz, early 1945 again to Mauthausen, Melk and Ebensee. After his rescue he went to Italy to Paris, where he still lives today.

Moniek Baumzecer
»I promised my mother to return home. My life between Radom and Paris«
Edited by Ulrich Baumann and Uwe Neumärker with Éditions le manuscrit and the Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah
Berlin, 2013

ISBN: 978-3-942240-09-3
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»I Sang to Survive. Memories of Rachov, Auschwitz and a new beginning in America«

Photo: Cover »I Sang to Survive«

Judith Schneiderman was born in 1928 into a Yiddish-speaking family that lived in what is today called Rachiw in the Carpathian region of Ukraine.  The town was originally called Rahó under the Autstro-Hungarian Empire and became a part of Czechoslovakia after the First World War before being given back to Hungary in 1939. After the German army occupied the country in 1944, the Jews in the area were deported to Auschwitz. Judith survived several Nazi concentration and extermination camps. It was singing, above all, which kept her strong. After the end of the war, she emigrated to America and her memoires were published there in 2009.

Judith Schneiderman with Jennifer Schneiderman
»I Sang to Survive. Memories of Rachov, Auschwitz and a new beginning in America«
Edited by Adam Kerpel-Fronius and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2013

ISBN: 978-3-942240-08-6
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»I Wanted to Go Back Home to East Prussia! The Survival of a German Sinto«

Photo: Cover »I Wanted to Go Back Home«

Reinhard Florian was born near Insterburg in 1923. He was ostracised as a child for being a ›gypsy‹ and encountered violence after the National Socialists came to power in 1933. He was arrested in 1941 and survived deportation, several National Socialist concentration camps, gruelling forced labour, hunger and a death march. After the war, it was difficult for him to make a new life for himself in Germany. For years, illness and trauma prevented him from finding regular work. Florian received no compensation as a former forced labourer until the late 1990s. His memoirs provide an insight into the previously unknown history of the persecution of the Sinti from East Prussia. Their publication coincided with the inauguration of the memorial to the Sinti and Roma of Europe Murdered under the National Socialist Regime, which was held on 24 October 2012. The second, revised edition came out in July 2013.

Click here to view the German version of the book.

Reinhard Florian
»I Wanted to Go Back Home to East Prussia! The Survival of a German Sinto«
Edited by Jana Mechelhoff-Herezi und Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2013

ISBN: 978-3-942240-07-9
Token charge:
7,50 plus shipping costs
Second, revised edition available
(in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»I’m called Nechama now. My life between Königsberg and Israel«

Picture: Cover »I’m called Nechama now. My life between Königsberg and Israel«

Nechama Drober (*1927) was born Hella Markowsky to a Jewish family in the East Prussian capital Königsberg. She witnessed the two mass deportations in summer 1942, during which she lost her closest friends, relatives and classmates. She also experienced the invasion of East Prussia by the Red Armym in 1945. Her father Paul was subsequently deported to Siberia, whilst her mother Martha and five year-old brother Denny starved to death. Hella Markowsky fled with her sister Rita via Lithuania to Kischinew, where they lived until emigrating to Israel in 1990.

Click here to view the German version of the book.

Nechma Drober
»I’m called Nechama now. My life between Königsberg and Israel«
Edited by Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2012

ISBN: 978-3-942240-06-2
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»How I Survived«

Picture: Cover »How I Survived«

Jack (Idel) Kagan (*1929) grew up in Nowogródek in eastern Poland. His childhood came to an abrupt end with the outbreak of war in autumn 1939. After two years of Soviet occupation, the German occupation and mass murder of Jews started in 1941. Idel was one of around 120 prisoners in the ghetto who managed to escape through a tunnel they dug themselves and subsequently joined the Jewish Bielski partisans. This group saved the lives of over 1,200 Jews – something unique in the history of the Holocaust. Jack Kagan emigrated to London after the war. Since 1991 he has established several monuments in his home town, which is now part of Belarus.

Click here to view the German version of the book.

Jack Kagan
»How I Survived«
Edited by Adam Kerpel-Fronius
Berlin, 2011

ISBN: 978-3-942240-05-5
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»The Birch Trees Stand Tall. Conversations with my Father Moshe«

Picture: Cover »The Birch Trees Stand Tall. Conversations with my Father Moshe«

Moshe Brezniak (1917–2003) relayed to his son Naphtali in detail the story of his survival during World War II in his home town, Polish Międzyrzec Podlaski (Mezritch). His flight began in August 1942, when the Hamburg Police Battalion 101 set up the largest transit ghetto of the Lublin district in Międzyrzec Podlaski, and he was able to, time and again, escape deportations and shootings. In May 1943, Moshe Brezniak was deported to the Majdanek concentration camp. He was a slave labourer in Auschwitz and later survived a death march. He emigrated to Palestine after the liberation in 1945. For the first time, the testimony of a survivor from Międzyrzec Podlaski has been published in German translation, telling the story of one of the central sites of the Holocaust – Jewish Mezritch.

Moshe Brezniak
»The Birch Trees Stand Tall. Conversations with my Father Moshe«
Edited by Constanze Jaiser and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2011


ISBN: 978-3-942240-04-8
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»Beyond Survival. From Breslau to Australia«

Picture: Cover »Beyond Survival. From Breslau to Australia«

Kenneth James Arkwright (*1929) was born as Klaus Aufrichtig in German Breslau. A branch of his Jewish family had lived in Silesia since the 16th century. Beginning 1943, Klaus Aufrichtig had to carry out forced labour in Breslau. In 1944, he was deported to a labour camp, but he managed to flee and go into hiding. In 1945, he returned to his home city of Breslau, however, a few weeks later he saw himself forced to leave for Erfurt. He began his studies in East Berlin and emigrated to Perth, Australia, via Paris in 1949, where he became a successful businessman.

Kenneth James Arkwright
»Beyond Survival. From Breslau to Australia«
Edited by Katharina Friedla and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2011


ISBN: 978-3-942240-03-1
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»Destined to Live. One Woman's War, Life, Loves remembered«

Sabina van der Linden-Wolanski (1927–2011) was the only member of her family to survive the Holocaust in eastern Poland. After the war, she spent time in Silesia (now part of Poland) and Paris before emigrating to Australia in 1950. A diary and a few photographs were all she had left to remind her of her youth. Decades later, these unique items became part of the exhibition in the Information Centre of the Holocaust Memorial. Sabina gave a speech as a guest of honour at the inauguration on 10 May 2005. Her autobiography is a testament to the determination and the uncertainties of a young girl facing violence and murder, but also to the strength of character that enabled Sabina to make a new start on the other side of the world as a wife, mother and businesswoman.

Sabina van der Linden-Wolanski
»Destined to Live. One Woman's War, Life, Loves remembered«
Edited by Ulrich Baumann and Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2016

ISBN: 978-3-942240-21-5 (English Edition)
ISBN: 978-3-942240-02-4 (German Edition)
Token charge: € 7,50 plus shipping costs
Available at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»End of Days in East Prussia. An Unspoken of Chapter of the Holocaust«

Picture: Cover »End of Days in East Prussia. An Unspoken of Chapter of the Holocaust«

January 1945. Hundreds of thousands in East Prussia have to flee from the Red Army. During this time, the SS chased at least 5,000 Jewish prisoners from Königsberg to the Baltic coast at Palmnicken. Only 15 people survived the death march and the massacre that followed – one of them was Maria Blitz from Cracow. 55 years later, now living in the US, she wrote down her story of persecution and imprisonment between 1939 and 1945 and her life story entitled ›My Holocaust‹.

The to-date unpublished text includes an historical explanatory note and further testimonies by eyewitnesses.

Maria Blitz
»End of Days in East Prussia. An Unspoken of Chapter of the Holocaust«
Edited by Uwe Neumärker
Berlin, 2010


ISBN: 978-3-942240-01-7
Token charge:
7,50 plus shipping costs
Second, revised edition available
(in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at

»›I am the Voice of the Six Million‹. The Video Archive at the Information Centre«

»I am the voice of the six million tortured and murdered Jews, and I am also the voice of the lucky few – the voice of the survivors«, said Sabina Van Der Linden-Wolanski in a speech during the opening of the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe on 10 May, 2005. Speaking on behalf of those who were murdered and at the same time speaking for one’s self – many survivors see this as their task and responsibility. This book deals with aspects such as the history, meaning and analysis of video testimonies, and the opportunities and problems of presenting such testimonies. The volume also contains analyses of life stories recorded specifically for the Video Archive at the Information Centre underneath the Field of Stelae.


ISBN: 978-3-942240-00-0
Token charge:
free of charge (only shipping costs)
Available (in german language only) at the Information Centre (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe), in book shops and at